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FIVE THINGS: THAT'S ONE FUNNY LOOKING CROC

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FIVE THINGS: THAT'S ONE FUNNY LOOKING CROC
Friday 24 May, 2019

Need a new shirt? Lacoste has launched an exclusive range that doesn’t compromise between style and animal conservation. In wackier news, we take a closer look at a seemingly cheeky IKEA ad that mocks Clive Palmer, a naturally sustainable death bed, cheese made from the bacteria of celebrities and the restaurant that's causing a buzz.

1. THAT'S ONE FUNNY LOOKING CROC
Lacoste is making a huge splash in brand-led environmentalism, replacing its iconic crocodile logo with ten endangered species as part of their new Save Our Species campaign. With limited availability of the new shirts relative to the number of each species left in the wild, the brand has pledged to donate all profits to its conservation partner the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

2. IKEA 1: PALMER 0
The best kind of ad for your brand? One you don't even have to make. Graphic designer Adrian Elton has taken it upon himself to create a spoof IKEA billboard roasting Clive Palmer’s $60 million election advertising budget. Captioned “Should’ve come to Ikea” and accompanied with an image of a $27.99 SNILLE Ikea chair, it's so well-played that many mistook it as an IKEA advertisement.

3. McHIVE
McDonald's Sweden is creating quite the buzz, opening its smallest ever restaurant – for bees. The McHive, complete with Golden Arches, drive-thru and all, was built to celebrate its beehive initiative. Throughout the country, restaurants have installed rooftop beehives to provide a safe place for a dwindling population of endangered bees.

4. BECOME ONE WITH NATURE
From 1 May 2020, Washington locals can legally lie (and die) in nature. Known as  human composting, the procedure involves laying the deceased in a specially designed container of carbon- and nitro-heavy materials for decomposition. The soil-like remains, if wanted by families, can then be collected after a month and either return to the earth or, believe it or not, used in gardening. Not only is the process cheaper than burying, it also doesn’t release carbon dioxide for a truly graceful departure.

5. CHEESE-LIST CELEBS
A exhibition of cheese cultured from bacteria of celebrities has just launched in London’s Victoria & Albert Museum. Part of the Food: Bigger than the Plate exhibition, famous individuals including chef Heston Blumenthal have had their noses, armpits and belly buttons swabbed, and their microbiome samples used to separate milk into curds. Don't be alarmed though – the finished cheeses, like Blumenthal’s comté, are not for consumption, just an educational, slightly stinky display.

 
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